Real Simple Eggs on Spinach and Haddock

High in protein and good fat, and low in calories, this egg-cellent brunch meal takes 15 minutes to whip up, with just five ingredients. So light and luscious!
Cook Time15 mins
Total Time15 mins
Course: Breakfast, Brunch
Cuisine: Canadian
Keyword: easy breakfasts, one pot recipes
Servings: 1 person
Calories: 220kcal
Cost: $3.69

Ingredients

  • 1 handful spinach per person
  • 1 haddock fillet per person fresh or frozen
  • 1 large egg per person
  • salt and pepper to taste

Instructions

  • In a saucepan, cook spinach (one large handful per person) in a bit of water until wilted. Press some of the water out against the side of the pan, and plate.
  • Add fresh or frozen haddock fillets (one per person) to the same pot and just cover with water (milk works too). Bring to a boil, then turn down the heat and simmer uncovered for 5 – 10 minutes, or until cooked. Take out and lay over the spinach.
  • Drop eggs into the water. (Again, one per person.) You can poach them, but it's easier just to drop into the water and allow to simmer until it's cooked to your liking.
  • Sprinkle with a pinch of salt and pepper, and enjoy right away.

Notes

Adapted from Comfort Bites Blog.

Eggs florentine with fish? Fish florentine?

enoki soy sauce mushrooms and eggs on spinach and haddock

I always find myself referring to this dish in my head as “Haddock Florentine.” Maybe it’s not accurate to call something a Florentine just because it has poached egg and spinach. I’m not sure what a Florentine is, now that I think of it. I’ve always thought it was any dish with eggs and spinach. But apparently it’s also a cookie? So in case I get flamed for calling this thing a haddock Florentine, I’ll just refer to it as “eggs on spinach and haddock.”

Anyway, whatever you wanna call it, today’s lunch is dead simple.

First, cook spinach (one large handful per person) in a bit of water until wilted. Press some of the water out against the side of the pan, and plate. Next, add fresh or frozen haddock fillets (one per person) and just cover with water (milk works too but I don’t find it necessary). Simmer until cooked. If you have fresh fillets, you can pan-fry them, but I found poaching just as good. No oil necessary! Then drop eggs into water. Ensure the water is only gently bubbling, so that when you drop in the eggs, they won’t get tossed around. You want the egg to stay in place as it cooks. Top with some s&p and you’re good to go.

An easy “poached egg” hack

enoki soy sauce mushrooms and haddock florentine

Since I’m terrible at poaching eggs, I came up with this method of cooking them instead. You don’t have to do anything to the egg, no swirling water to make a whirlpool, no adding vinegar, but you get the same soft, runny yolk that is the best part of a poached egg.

The key is to not use too much water – just enough to cover the egg and that’s it. And make sure the water is at a very gentle simmer, barely bubbling. Then crack the egg and let it slip slowly into the water. It shouldn’t move very much.

Let it simmer for at least five minutes which will allow the egg to be firm enough to be scooped up. You can cook longer depending on how done you like your eggs. Be gentle when lifting them out of the water because they are slippery and fragile. (I used a large spatula; a slotted spoon would work too.) You don’t want to accidentally break them and lose that precious yolk!

Eggs on spinach and haddock… or any other fish…

enoki soy sauce mushrooms and eggs on spinach and haddock

Of course, if you don’t have haddock, you can use any kind of white fish. Substitute cod, halibut, bass, or whatever other fillet you have on hand. I bet smoked haddock would make this taste even more killer, but we only had regular ol’ haddock lying around in the freezer.

I served this recipe with a soy sauce enoki mushroom dish.

Tags:

2 Comments

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.